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Before ‘Pong,’ There Was ‘Tennis for Two’
Before the era of electronic ping pong, hungry yellow dots, plumbers, mushrooms, and fire-flowers, people waited in line to play video games at roller-skating rinks, arcades, and other hangouts. More than fifty years ago, before either arcades or home video games, visitors waited in line at Brookhaven National Laboratory to play “Tennis for Two,” an electronic tennis game that is unquestionably a forerunner of the modern video game.
Tennis for Two was first introduced on October 18, 1958, at one of the Lab’s annual visitors’ days. Two people played the electronic tennis game with separate controllers that connected to an analog computer and used an oscilloscope for a screen. The game’s creator, William Higinbotham, was a nuclear physicist lobbied for nuclear nonproliferation as the first chair of the Federation of American Scientists. 
…
Visitors playing Tennis for Two saw a two-dimensional, side view of a tennis court on the oscilloscope screen, which used a cathode-ray tube similar to a black and white television tube. The ball, a brightly lit, moving dot, left trails as it bounced to alternating sides of the net. Players served and volleyed using controllers with buttons and rotating dials to control the angle of an invisible tennis racquet’s swing.
(Read more at Brookhaven National Laboratory | History:The First Video Game?)

Before ‘Pong,’ There Was ‘Tennis for Two’

Before the era of electronic ping pong, hungry yellow dots, plumbers, mushrooms, and fire-flowers, people waited in line to play video games at roller-skating rinks, arcades, and other hangouts. More than fifty years ago, before either arcades or home video games, visitors waited in line at Brookhaven National Laboratory to play “Tennis for Two,” an electronic tennis game that is unquestionably a forerunner of the modern video game.

Tennis for Two was first introduced on October 18, 1958, at one of the Lab’s annual visitors’ days. Two people played the electronic tennis game with separate controllers that connected to an analog computer and used an oscilloscope for a screen. The game’s creator, William Higinbotham, was a nuclear physicist lobbied for nuclear nonproliferation as the first chair of the Federation of American Scientists. 

Visitors playing Tennis for Two saw a two-dimensional, side view of a tennis court on the oscilloscope screen, which used a cathode-ray tube similar to a black and white television tube. The ball, a brightly lit, moving dot, left trails as it bounced to alternating sides of the net. Players served and volleyed using controllers with buttons and rotating dials to control the angle of an invisible tennis racquet’s swing.

(Read more at Brookhaven National Laboratory | History:The First Video Game?)

Via Gizmodo: Aerosmith made more money on Guitar Hero than from any of their albums

Back in 2008, first week sales for the game topped 567,000 copies and by 2010 more than 3.6 million copies had been sold. On top of the money they made from licensing to Activision, the band saw a huge uptick in sales from their back catalog as well. The game was a great advertising tool, driving more attention for album sales, and continued popularity of the band which expanded further licensing opportunities — the great circle of life in the music business.

Via Gizmodo: Aerosmith made more money on Guitar Hero than from any of their albums

Back in 2008, first week sales for the game topped 567,000 copies and by 2010 more than 3.6 million copies had been sold. On top of the money they made from licensing to Activision, the band saw a huge uptick in sales from their back catalog as well. The game was a great advertising tool, driving more attention for album sales, and continued popularity of the band which expanded further licensing opportunities — the great circle of life in the music business.

Pixel art games aren’t retro, they’re the future
The best game on the Xbox One right now is the frantic, blocky side-scroller Super Time Force (above), and you could make the same case for TowerFall: Ascension on the PlayStation 4. Both of these use pixel art — the chunky 2D graphical style that harkens back to the ’80s and early ’90s — and the upshot is that it’s okay for new games to look old again.
But why has this happened? Have pixels proved themselves as the building blocks of a legitimate art form, or is it all just a retro fad?
…
"Certainly, nostalgia is a factor with pixel art, but it isn’t the beginning nor the end of the style. We believe that pixel art is just that —­ an art style,­ no different than realistic 3D or traditional 2D. It can be interpreted and manipulated differently by every artist, resulting in wildly different aesthetics under the same general umbrella," says Nathan Vella, co-founder and president of Super Time Force and Superbrothers: Sword and Sworcery EP developer Capybara Games. 
(Read More at The Verge.)

Pixel art games aren’t retro, they’re the future

The best game on the Xbox One right now is the frantic, blocky side-scroller Super Time Force (above), and you could make the same case for TowerFall: Ascension on the PlayStation 4. Both of these use pixel art — the chunky 2D graphical style that harkens back to the ’80s and early ’90s — and the upshot is that it’s okay for new games to look old again.

But why has this happened? Have pixels proved themselves as the building blocks of a legitimate art form, or is it all just a retro fad?

"Certainly, nostalgia is a factor with pixel art, but it isn’t the beginning nor the end of the style. We believe that pixel art is just that —­ an art style,­ no different than realistic 3D or traditional 2D. It can be interpreted and manipulated differently by every artist, resulting in wildly different aesthetics under the same general umbrella," says Nathan Vella, co-founder and president of Super Time Force and Superbrothers: Sword and Sworcery EP developer Capybara Games

(Read More at The Verge.)