NPR

header

Where NPR presses start

5 Things I Learned as the Internet’s Most Hated Person
(WARNING: Some NSFW language)

Hi. My name is Zoe, and I make weird video games with some degree of success (and make them playable for free, if you’re so inclined). My life is generally pretty uncomplicated, I guess, aside from the fact that a month ago the Internet decided to make me the center of a supposed global conspiracy. I made the mistake of dating a guy who would later go on to write a several-act manifesto about my alleged sex life and post it to every forum he could create a handle for. Normally, this would blow over with little more than a “whoa, check out THAT guy,” but since I work in an industry that has very strong feelings about women, it quickly mutated from a jilted ex’s revenge-porn to one of the most intense scandals in recent gaming history.

OK, so before the frothing calls of “this is only one side of the story, blah, blah,” here’s the short and skinny of it: It doesn’t matter whether or not you like Zoe Quinn, her game or agree with the things she was accused of by her ex. You can think she is the worst person in the world, the absolute worst. That’s fine, that is your opinion. However, nothing, I repeat NOTHING in this industry warrants death threats, doxxing and harassment. Period.
And if someone on the other side of this “movement” can write a legitimate, reasoned post without using all of the colorful expletives of a George Carlin routine, I’ll happily read it. I won’t agree with it, most likely, but I’ll read. You know what I won’t do? Threaten your life or your personal well being simply for disagreeing with your opinion, because that would be lame and childish.

5 Things I Learned as the Internet’s Most Hated Person

(WARNING: Some NSFW language)

Hi. My name is Zoe, and I make weird video games with some degree of success (and make them playable for free, if you’re so inclined). My life is generally pretty uncomplicated, I guess, aside from the fact that a month ago the Internet decided to make me the center of a supposed global conspiracy. I made the mistake of dating a guy who would later go on to write a several-act manifesto about my alleged sex life and post it to every forum he could create a handle for. Normally, this would blow over with little more than a “whoa, check out THAT guy,” but since I work in an industry that has very strong feelings about women, it quickly mutated from a jilted ex’s revenge-porn to one of the most intense scandals in recent gaming history.

OK, so before the frothing calls of “this is only one side of the story, blah, blah,” here’s the short and skinny of it: It doesn’t matter whether or not you like Zoe Quinn, her game or agree with the things she was accused of by her ex. You can think she is the worst person in the world, the absolute worst. That’s fine, that is your opinion. However, nothing, I repeat NOTHING in this industry warrants death threats, doxxing and harassment. Period.

And if someone on the other side of this “movement” can write a legitimate, reasoned post without using all of the colorful expletives of a George Carlin routine, I’ll happily read it. I won’t agree with it, most likely, but I’ll read. You know what I won’t do? Threaten your life or your personal well being simply for disagreeing with your opinion, because that would be lame and childish.



With Minecraft, Microsoft Buys A Doorway To Millions Of Players

Since its release, Minecraft has become that doorway for a great many players of all ages and demographics, especially those that might not label themselves as a “gamer.” Like Farmville or Candy Crush, it is entry-level gaming. Minecraft is casual; there are no explosions no big action scenes or politics or machismo-heavy protagonists. You are in control of its world and it is only as difficult as you want to make it.
What Microsoft has essentially done is buy a very popular doorway. As new players enter the world of video games through Minecraft, either in its current or possible future versions, Microsoft will now be the doorman ushering that player into its game room instead of the competition’s.

This is my quick take on the Microsoft/Minecraft buy and why they might have chosen to spend so much for a game that seems to have already reached its zenith. It is unclear what Microsoft has in store for the future of the game. But Minecraft has a massive and very vocal community, so Microsoft would should definitely tread lightly when it comes to any changes that could disrupt what people have come to know and love.
EDIT: OK, I forgot about the TNT and other explosions in Minecraft. An earlier version of this post mentioned that there were “no explosions,” which was the wrong way to communicate that there isn’t action in Minecraft the way there is in something like Halo or Call of Duty. This has been corrected, but I accept your flogging Internet.
— SM

With Minecraft, Microsoft Buys A Doorway To Millions Of Players

Since its release, Minecraft has become that doorway for a great many players of all ages and demographics, especially those that might not label themselves as a “gamer.” Like Farmville or Candy Crush, it is entry-level gaming. Minecraft is casual; there are no explosions no big action scenes or politics or machismo-heavy protagonists. You are in control of its world and it is only as difficult as you want to make it.

What Microsoft has essentially done is buy a very popular doorway. As new players enter the world of video games through Minecraft, either in its current or possible future versions, Microsoft will now be the doorman ushering that player into its game room instead of the competition’s.

This is my quick take on the Microsoft/Minecraft buy and why they might have chosen to spend so much for a game that seems to have already reached its zenith. It is unclear what Microsoft has in store for the future of the game. But Minecraft has a massive and very vocal community, so Microsoft would should definitely tread lightly when it comes to any changes that could disrupt what people have come to know and love.

EDIT: OK, I forgot about the TNT and other explosions in Minecraft. An earlier version of this post mentioned that there were “no explosions,” which was the wrong way to communicate that there isn’t action in Minecraft the way there is in something like Halo or Call of Duty. This has been corrected, but I accept your flogging Internet.

— SM

Longtime gaming personality and expert Adam Sessler was on Weekend Edition Sunday to talk about the incredibly-hyped game Destiny, which released last week on multiple platforms. In short, he says the game is gorgeous but doesn’t live up to the expectations set by the massive pre-release hype. You can listen to his full interview with NPR’s Lynn Neary here.