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From Weekend All Things Considered: One Feminist Critic’s Battle With Gaming’s Darker Side

"Since I announced that I was going to be doing a video series specifically looking at the representations of women in video games I have been attacked, and ultimately terrorized, for two years because of this series. Everything from my social media accounts flooded with misogynist and racist slurs to trying to hack into my social media and email."

The strife in the billion-dollar gaming industry has now vaulted out of the niche gaming press and into the mainstream. The New York Times gave it front-page treatment after these most recent threats against Anita Sarkeesian that forced her to cancel at talk at Utah State University. She spoke with NPR’s Arun Rath about her history of harassment and why she thinks she, and women like her, are such targets by certain segments of the gaming community.

From Weekend All Things Considered: One Feminist Critic’s Battle With Gaming’s Darker Side

"Since I announced that I was going to be doing a video series specifically looking at the representations of women in video games I have been attacked, and ultimately terrorized, for two years because of this series. Everything from my social media accounts flooded with misogynist and racist slurs to trying to hack into my social media and email."

The strife in the billion-dollar gaming industry has now vaulted out of the niche gaming press and into the mainstream. The New York Times gave it front-page treatment after these most recent threats against Anita Sarkeesian that forced her to cancel at talk at Utah State University. She spoke with NPR’s Arun Rath about her history of harassment and why she thinks she, and women like her, are such targets by certain segments of the gaming community.

“If GamerGate simply wants a conservative counter to what they consider a left-leaning gaming press, I think that’s great! That’s healthy! You don’t have to like the way we or any other outlet cover video games. If you truly believe there’s an army of people who reject “progressive” voices and outlets like Polygon and Kotaku, or who would prefer coverage “just about the games,” then I’d encourage you to start a new site for those readers. There’s no easier or better time to do it.”

— Chris Grant, Polygon Editor-in-chief

More media outlets are getting involved in and fostering the debate on #Gamergate, harassment and gaming culture. This discussion on HuffPost Live includes Brianna Wu, Erik Kain of Forbes and 8chan admin Frederick Brennan.

For those unfamiliar, 8hcan is an offshoot of 4chan created to house #Gamergate discussion after 4chan shut it down and banned the topic where much of the #Gamergate discussions are being held after 4chan banned the topic.

Here’s the HuffPost Live link in case the embed doesn’t show up.

Via Polygon: Game developer Brianna Wu flees home after death threats, Mass. police investigating

"Wu was targeted after tweeting a series of images critical of those who identify with the GamerGate campaign. After tweeting that members of the 8chan message board — a refuge for former 4chan posters — and GamerGate supporters had posted her personal information online, Wu republished a series of disturbing stream of tweets that contained violent threats and her home address.”

Ugh, here we go again. Warning: Some of the tweets involved in this incident are particularly foul.

Via Polygon: Game developer Brianna Wu flees home after death threats, Mass. police investigating

"Wu was targeted after tweeting a series of images critical of those who identify with the GamerGate campaign. After tweeting that members of the 8chan message board — a refuge for former 4chan posters — and GamerGate supporters had posted her personal information online, Wu republished a series of disturbing stream of tweets that contained violent threats and her home address.”

Ugh, here we go again. Warning: Some of the tweets involved in this incident are particularly foul.

From NPR’s Planet Money: You Can Create A Hit Video Game About Anything. Even Making Toast

I wanted to see if game designers could create an addictive game out of anything. So I asked a bunch of people how to make a great game about the most boring thing I could think of: making toast.
You’d want the toast to look “cute,” says Roger Dickey, who created the video game Mafia Wars. And you’d want “something twitchy, where you have to tap the toast at the just right time for it to come out of the toaster.”

From NPR’s Planet Money: You Can Create A Hit Video Game About Anything. Even Making Toast

I wanted to see if game designers could create an addictive game out of anything. So I asked a bunch of people how to make a great game about the most boring thing I could think of: making toast.

You’d want the toast to look “cute,” says Roger Dickey, who created the video game Mafia Wars. And you’d want “something twitchy, where you have to tap the toast at the just right time for it to come out of the toaster.”